Ten Facts About Child Illiteracy in America September 15 2014

At Arden Anne, we care a lot about child illiteracy right here in our backyard. That's why we donate a children's book with every purchase made on Arden Anne.

To know why we care so deeply about this issue, perhaps these ten facts - which you may already have seen in some list or another - will make you understand.

  1. Two-thirds of students who cannot read proficiently by the end of 4th grade will end up in jail or on welfare.
  2. 1 in 4 children in America grow up without learning how to read.
  3. Kids who don't read proficiently by 4th grade are 4 times likelier to drop out of school. 
  4. As of 2011, America was the only free-market OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) country where the current generation was less well educated than the previous.
  5. Nearly 85% of the juveniles who face trial in the juvenile court system are functionally illiterate, proving that there is a close relationship between illiteracy and crime. More than 60% of all inmates are functionally illiterate.
  6. 53% of 4th graders admitted to reading recreationally “almost every day,” while only 20% of 8th graders could say the same.
  7. 75% of Americans who receive food stamps perform at the lowest 2 levels of literacy, and 90% of high school dropouts are on welfare.
  8. Teenage girls ages 16 to 19 who live at or below the poverty level and have below average literacy skills are 6 times more likely to have children out of wedlock than the girls their age who can read proficiently.
  9. Reports show that low literacy directly costs the healthcare industry over $70 million every year.
  10. In 2013, Washington, D.C. was ranked the most literate American city for the third year in a row, with Seattle and Minneapolis close behind, while Long Beach, CA was ranked the country’s most illiterate city, followed by Mesa, AZ, and Aurora, CO.

These statistics, which are factual, should frighten us all into taking action for our children. Please support our effort to reduce, and eventually end, child illiteracy in the world's most affluent country.

 

Sources:

  1. One World Literacy Foundation.. "Illiteracy Statistics." One World Literacy. Accessed April 16, 2014.
  2. WriteExpress Corporation. "Literacy Statistics." Begin to Read. Accessed April 16, 2014.
  3. Cullinan, Bernice E. "Independent Reading and School Achievement", American Association of School Librarians. Accessed February 2014.
  4. Council for Advancement of Adult Literacy. "Reach Higher, America Overcoming Crisis In The U.s. Workforce." National Commission on Adult Literacy. Accessed April 16, 2014.
  5. Blankenship, John. "Functional illiteracy continues to grow, but there is help." The Register-Herald. Accessed April 16, 2014.
  6. American Council on Education. "Literacy Facts > Literacy in America." Gaston Literacy Council, Inc. Accessed April 16, 2014.
  7. American Council on Education. "Literacy Facts > Literacy in America." Gaston Literacy Council, Inc. Accessed April 16, 2014.
  8. American Council on Education. "Literacy Facts > Literacy in America." Gaston Literacy Council, Inc. Accessed April 16, 2014.
  9. American Council on Education. "Literacy Facts > Literacy in America." Gaston Literacy Council, Inc. Accessed April 16, 2014.
  10. Hess, Alexander E.M., Samuel Weigley, and Michael B. Sauter. "America’s Most (and Least) Literate Cities." 24/7 Wall St.com. Accessed April 16, 2014.